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Black Food Fridays Roundup!

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We’ve answered the call of Chef KJ Kearney and his 2020 Instagram sensation, @blackfoodfridays  to consciously spend our money at Black-owned restaurants every Friday. Here, we’re compiling the spots we’ve visited, so that you can join us in checking out some of Charleston’s finest Black-owned restaurants, and get a more complete view of the Lowcountry’s…

Ingredient Spotlight: Corn

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In honor of Indigenous People’s Day, October’s Ingredient Spotlight lands on an agricultural mainstay with an enduring history in South Carolina that predates the white colonizing powers for whom Charleston is named. Today, we’re talking about corn.  As a contemporary commercial ingredient, corn is arguably overused in the American diet, and to that end has…

Rum in Charleston, Past and Present

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With its subtropical climate and colorful streetscapes reminiscent of islands like Barbados, many visitors to Charleston make the assumption that Charleston has long been a rum-producing city. Those visitors are often disappointed to hear that, despite appearances, their assumption is incorrect. Sugar cane failed to take root as a major crop in South Carolina the…

The Waffle House Hashbrown Code

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Those of us that grew up with Waffle House recognize it as something more than a restaurant. It’s the South’s Everyman sit-down, 24-hour yellow glow of homey, affordable, comfort. You’ll find the tables inside populated by high-schoolers sipping on cheap coffee refills, touring musicians wolfing down Texas Melts, post-bar college kids loudly joking over waffles…

Women In Charge: The Female Face of Charleston’s Culinary Scene

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Today marks the anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, granting the right to vote to all Americans, regardless of sex. We wish to celebrate this landmark of women’s suffrage, and to recognize the non-white female voices that were largely left out of this historic amendment, despite the efforts of the many nonwhite suffragists…

Soup to (Boiled) Nuts: The Peanut’s Long Journey to South Carolina

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The history of peanuts in the United States in general, and in the Southern states specifically, is inseparably tied to the African diaspora; as is the case for many foods for which the Carolinas are now famous. Peanuts find their native footing in ancient South America, where their nutritious, substantive character seemed to be as…

IPAs: A Hoppy History with Cicerone Coby Glass

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When I emailed local Cicerone, professional beer tour guide, and all-around lover of suds Coby Glass to advise me in a simple beer pairing matter for National IPA Day, I had no idea that I was setting myself for an afternoon of hands-on beer education. Expecting a reply along the lines of “She-Crab soup goes…

Delivery Creativity

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As COVID-19 brought Charleston’s world-renowned restaurant scene to a grinding halt back in March, local diners started to get anxious. Living in one of the most foodie-friendly cities in the country tends to spoil you a bit. Menus featuring seasonal produce from nearby farms or seafood caught from local waterways abound around these parts, as…