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Rum in Charleston, Past and Present

an empty bottle on a table

With its subtropical climate and colorful streetscapes reminiscent of islands like Barbados, many visitors to Charleston make the assumption that Charleston has long been a rum-producing city. Those visitors are often disappointed to hear that, despite appearances, their assumption is incorrect. Sugar cane failed to take root as a major crop in South Carolina the…

The Waffle House Hashbrown Code

a sign in front of a building

Those of us that grew up with Waffle House recognize it as something more than a restaurant. It’s the South’s Everyman sit-down, 24-hour yellow glow of homey, affordable, comfort. You’ll find the tables inside populated by high-schoolers sipping on cheap coffee refills, touring musicians wolfing down Texas Melts, post-bar college kids loudly joking over waffles…

Women In Charge: The Female Face of Charleston’s Culinary Scene

a group of people preparing food on a table

Today marks the anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, granting the right to vote to all Americans, regardless of sex. We wish to celebrate this landmark of women’s suffrage, and to recognize the non-white female voices that were largely left out of this historic amendment, despite the efforts of the many nonwhite suffragists…

Soup to (Boiled) Nuts: The Peanut’s Long Journey to South Carolina

a sign on the side of a building

The history of peanuts in the United States in general, and in the Southern states specifically, is inseparably tied to the African diaspora; as is the case for many foods for which the Carolinas are now famous. Peanuts find their native footing in ancient South America, where their nutritious, substantive character seemed to be as…

IPAs: A Hoppy History with Cicerone Coby Glass

a man sitting at a picnic table

When I emailed local Cicerone, professional beer tour guide, and all-around lover of suds Coby Glass to advise me in a simple beer pairing matter for National IPA Day, I had no idea that I was setting myself for an afternoon of hands-on beer education. Expecting a reply along the lines of “She-Crab soup goes…

46 State Street: A Proper Introduction

a close up of a brick building

In the heart of Charleston’s historic French Quarter neighborhood, State Street (named Union Street, before simmering years of pre-Civil War conflict prompted a name change in 1860), had already seen plenty of history before 46 State was built as it stands today. As was the case in every bustling city of the colonial American settlements,…

Ingredient Spotlight: Okra

a close up of a green field

“This okra is cooked perfectly, and I’m pretty snobby about my okra,” quips food celeb Padma Lakshmi to Bill Green, chef and co-owner of the Gullah Grub restaurant of St. Helena Island, in the fourth episode of Padma’s newest show, “Taste the Nation”. Through the series, Padma explores the multicultural, multi-ethnic origins of America’s favorite…

Masking up for Culinary Tours!

a person standing in a kitchen preparing food

Like many Charlestonians that have been here since college days, I’ve got a bevy of friends that work in Charleston’s substantial service industry. I can count rickshaw riders, hotel employees, tour guides, museum docents and more among my longtime buddies in town – but many of my very closest and oldest friends are in the…

Revolutionary Summer Dining

Sunrise over Charleston harbor

Summer 2020 has proven to be extraordinary in more ways than one. COVID-19 has changed how we’re eating out, and the Black Lives Matter movement has us thinking about all the remarkable Black-owned and operated restaurants in and around the Palmetto City. If you’ve seen Chef KJ Kearney’s #BlackFoodFridays posts, maybe you’ve already come across…